Monthly Archives: February 2013

Iris unguicularis

Iris bud unfurling

Iris unguicularis

Large clump of Iris doing it's stuff

This Plane tree is massive and the house you see behind it and the fernery where built around it. You can see the pulmonite from the old fernery in the forground.

This Plane tree is massive and the house you see behind it and the fernery where built around it. You can see the pulmonite from the old fernery in the forground.

As previosly commented on I think these winter flowering Irises are just flamboyant and beautiful!and remind me of that rather cheesey Albert Camus quote. There are few other winter flowering Irises; Iris reticlata vars and Iris lazica. I dont have any pics of the later but a recent trip to Savill Garden in Windsor Great Park I spotted a couple of nice varieties of reticulata, Cantab and Harmony which I have in my garden also (harvested from B&Q in the bulb sale

 

 

Ilex cultivars

Firstly apologies for not posting for 9 days, my camera has been busy but not my keyboard!

On my quest for winter interest I don’t have to go far in the Harris garden. There are numerous Hollies which I have attempted to name correctly – please be gentle with me if I have got them wrong , some a very similar and others I have guessed but you will see what I mean when you get to images…

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Ilex aquifolium ‘Madame Briot’

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Ilex aquifolium ‘Milk maid’

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Ilex x altaclerensis ‘Belgica Aurea’ AGM

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So what does this view from a snow covered border in the Harris garden say? the obvious prettiness of the unifying white mulch that visited us recently, covers weeds dead leaves and make everything look ace….

Theirs more; this area was cleared of very mature Prunus lusitanica in the Autumn of 2010. Following the removal of the stumps some amazing things happened.A layer of herbaceous stuff appeared as expected; this was mainly fox gloves which looked awesome but did impinge on our newly planted bulbs and have been weeded out now (pics to follow) .

Whats more interesting is that on the edge of this border, there is a large, as yet unidentified Eucalyptus. This had dropped years of seed on this area.

Three seedlings germinated after the clearance and you can see one of them in the bottom of this photo.I believe Eucalyptus in the wild needs bush fire to trigger germination (this may be a generalization). I have never heard of Eucalyptus seeding themselves in the UK, only much warm climates where they have become an invasive species.

I had the good fortune to meet the new Director of Kew on a visit to the University recently and pointed this out to him; he was amazed as I was that these trees can seed themselves in the UK. He just said ‘Climate change’ …..

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So what does this view from a snow covered border in the Harris garden say? the obvious prettiness of the unifying white mulch that visited us recently, covers weeds dead leaves and make everything look ace….

Theirs more; this area was cleared of very mature Prunus lusitanica in the Autumn of 2010. Following the removal of the stumps some amazing things happened.A layer of herbaceous stuff appeared as expected; this was mainly fox gloves which looked awesome but did impinge on our newly planted bulbs and have been weeded out now (pics to follow) .

Whats more interesting is that on the edge of this border, there is a large, as yet unidentified Eucalyptus. This had dropped years of seed on this area.

Three seedlings germinated after the clearance and you can see one of them in the bottom of this photo.I believe Eucalyptus in the wild needs bush fire to trigger germination (this may be a generalization). I have never heard of Eucalyptus seeding themselves in the UK, only much warm climates where they have become an invasive species.

I had the good fortune to meet the new Director of Kew on a visit to the University recently and pointed this out to him; he was amazed as I was that these trees can seed themselves in the UK. He just said ‘Climate change’ …..